ALPA

Leadership From the Cockpit

A year into the pandemic, the Canadian government has yet to provide substantive support for the airline industry. The jobs of the nation’s aviation workers—some of the hardest hit by the pandemic—and the nation’s economic recovery remain in jeopardy. Despite cautious optimism for the year ahead, Canadian aviation needs help now.

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With the airline industry’s global scope, pilots often witness history in the making and sometimes even take an active role. For the pilots of Kalitta Air, it is often another day’s work. Members of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) since 2018, these pilots have recently been honored for their extraordinary, global efforts at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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On the night of February 12, 2009, Colgan Air Flight 3407 crashed on approach to Buffalo, N.Y. All 49 passengers and crew died, as well as one fatality on the ground. The accident was the last in a series of four high-profile fatal airline accidents over a six-year timeframe in the United States, and the ensuing investigation introduced serious questions regarding numerous safety issues within the airline industry—in particular, pilot training, experience, and qualifications. 

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In a year that started strong for our industry, the drastic shift in demand in early 2020 led to changes in how we all operate, including your union’s communications.

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On December 17, ALPA will close its office at 1625 Massachusetts Avenue NW, in Washington, D.C. Centrally located near industry trade organizations and other labor unions, the glass-and-marble, eight-story building is where ALPA established its reputation as the largest nongovernmental aviation safety organization in the world.

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