ALPA

Leadership From the Cockpit

40 Results for Category Safety

With the legislative clock ticking and time running out, Washington, D.C., special interests like the Regional Airline Association are in overdrive trying to persuade Congress to put profits ahead of safety in the FAA reauthorization. Unfortunately for airline passengers, these lobbying efforts could threaten the unparalleled record of safety the United States has enjoyed since passage of the Airline Safety and FAA Extension Act of 2010, which improved airline pilot training, qualification, and flight-experience requirements. 



Categories: Advocacy, Safety


No one is more committed to ensuring we have enough qualified and experienced pilots to keep commercial aviation safe than the Air Line Pilots Association. The good news is that we currently have more fully qualified pilots in the United States than there are positions available, and air travel is the safest mode of transportation in the world due to our commitment to schedule with safety. However, we do need to make sure we have an adequate future supply of qualified pilots – earning good salaries – and guard against efforts to reduce safety, especially as it relates to pilot training and qualifications. That’s why the Air Line Pilots Association has worked for many years to mentor and inspire the next generation of pilots and advocate for loan forgiveness programs and other incentives to make it more affordable to become an airline pilot. .

Categories: Industry, Safety


As ALPA celebrates its 86th anniversary, we reflect on the strides we’ve made to improve the safety of aviation in the United States, Canada and around the globe. Our dedicated members are always seeking to enhance and maintain the safety of our skies.

In 2010, we made significant progress when the U.S. Congress passed more robust pilot training and qualifications requirements. Thanks to these higher pilot training standards, the U.S. has enjoyed the longest period in aviation history without an accident. 

Categories: Advocacy, Safety


Congress is currently reviewing pilot training standards, and what they decide could have an enormous impact on the safety of air travel. The data speaks for itself: Between 1990 and 2009, more than 1,100 people died in accidents on U.S. Part 121 passenger airlines. Since new pilot training and qualifications requirements were passed by Congress in 2010, the United States has not experienced a single fatality on these carriers, proving that well-trained pilots save lives.

Categories: Advocacy, Regulatory, Safety


Canadian airline pilots have some of the longest shifts in the world. Despite ALPA’s continued efforts to update Canada’s outdated flight/duty time rule, the country’s pilots are often required to be alert for more than 14 hours, which can be extended to 17 hours in the event of weather or mechanical delays, putting them at greater risk for accidents and safety incidents due to fatigue.

Categories: Advocacy, Safety
Tags: Canada


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