ALPA Supports the Promoting Women in Aviation Workforce Act


On Dec. 18, 2017, Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) introduced S. 2244, the Promoting Women in Aviation Workforce Act.

Although women make up more than 50 percent of the nation’s workforce, they’re currently underrepresented in the aviation industry, representing only 6 percent of airline pilots.

S. 2244 will establish an advisory board at the FAA, composed of aerospace, business, nonprofit, and Civil Air Patrol representatives to better ensure that the industry is promoting programs that provide for the education, training, and recruitment of women into this growing field. The bill also expresses that industry stakeholders should explore the possibility of providing or expanding opportunities, such as pilot training, STEM education, and mentorship programs, which will help women from a young age learn about and prepare for a career in aviation.

Companion legislation, H.R. 4673, that was introduced in the U.S. House of Representative by Reps. Elizabeth Esty (D-CT), Jackie Walorski (R-IN), Cheri Bustos (D-IL), and Mimi Walters (R-CA) was recently passed.

ALPA is urging Congress to pass this important legislation as the Association continues to promote constructive ways to encourage women to enter the aviation profession.

“Although women make up more than 50 percent of our nation’s workforce, they’re significantly underrepresented in the aviation industry, representing just six percent of pilots, four percent of flight engineers, and two percent of airline mechanics. Our bipartisan legislation encourages the aviation industry to offer opportunities, such as pilot training, STEM education, and mentorship programs that would help women to pursue and succeed in aviation-related careers.”

—Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME)

“When I was training to become a pilot, it was rare to see another woman in my class. Although some progress has been made to help women enter the aviation field, we’re still dramatically underrepresented among pilots, and we need to do more.”

—Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), one of the first female soldiers in the Army to fly combat missions during Operation Iraqi Freedom


This article was originally published in the May 2018 issue of Air Line Pilot.

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