ALPA

Leadership From the Cockpit

On the night of February 12, 2009, Colgan Air Flight 3407 crashed on approach to Buffalo, N.Y. All 49 passengers and crew died, as well as one fatality on the ground. The accident was the last in a series of four high-profile fatal airline accidents over a six-year timeframe in the United States, and the ensuing investigation introduced serious questions regarding numerous safety issues within the airline industry—in particular, pilot training, experience, and qualifications. 

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In a year that started strong for our industry, the drastic shift in demand in early 2020 led to changes in how we all operate, including your union’s communications.

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On December 17, ALPA will close its office at 1625 Massachusetts Avenue NW, in Washington, D.C. Centrally located near industry trade organizations and other labor unions, the glass-and-marble, eight-story building is where ALPA established its reputation as the largest nongovernmental aviation safety organization in the world.

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A World War II fighter ace, Air Force general, and—according to author Tom Wolfe—“the most righteous of all the possessors of the right stuff” died on Monday, December 7, at the age of 97. Charles Elwood “Chuck” Yeager’s exploits inspired generations of pilots, having flown more than 300 types of aircraft in every country in the world and logging about 18,000 hours.

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The world has faced a challenging year, but individuals and communities—including ALPA pilots—are exploring inventive new ways to come together to give back. Many pilot-run nonprofits organize annual charitable drives for the holidays, and this year is no exception.

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